Monday, 13 April 2015

Probably Apochryphal, but...

Mrs L copied me into an article on Facepage which tells a story about an old lady perpetually on a cruise ship because, for excellent 'care', it is far less costly than a care home on-shore.


So, what's the one cost that the care home has to pay that the ship doesn't?


And what is the way in which this could be adjusted?

4 comments:

The Stigler said...

In this case, I'm not sure how much land is affected. It's easy to move old people to Hull or mid-Wiltshire where land is very cheap.

But there is another thing - legal overheads. If you go into a care home, you, or your family are going to pay for a load of legal stuff that has been piled onto care homes, taking the annual cost to something around £30K/annum. Go onto a cruise ship, it's registered in the Bahamas or Liberia and all of that vanishes. You'll probably get better care (cruise ships are very good with the elderly and infirm) too.

paulc156 said...

Nursing care is a lot more expensive than just accommodation and grub. If the old lady is just a bit unsteady on her pins she doesn't need much more than a phone by her bed which can double as a panic button and 3 meals a day. If she was in need of regular attention of a nurse or doctor and was a high risk for a coronary or some other chronic condition a cruise ship is not going to be suitable at all. Also cruise ships are bloody expensive unless you go out of season and/or they stick you in a broom cupboard which doubles up as a windowless room for those on limited budgets.

Lola said...

TS. That's all still 'rent'. IMHO.
P156 I did specify a 'care' home. Not a 'nursing' home. Mind you, you could just moor your ship a dozen miles off Frinton and do both - rent free.

Physiocrat said...

UK Tax nominally paid by care home employees.