Tuesday, 27 August 2013

"Brick consumption to double in a year"

From The Telegraph:

Plans now exist to squander more than 3 billion precious bricks on building new homes, an analysis of council documents has found. The basic materials include some of England's most treasured raw materials, including clay and shale from parts of Dorset and the rural outskirts of York.

In addition, more than 10 thousand miles of copper and fibre optic cables will be lost to office blocks, warehouses and the HS2 rail link, according to the research carried out by the Campaign to Protect Britain's Building Materials (CPBBM).

The increase comes after planning reforms diluted the protection given to our dwindling reserves of aggregates and introduced a "presumption in favour of sustainable brick firing". 
The CPBBM analysis shows that there are now dozens of areas of protected land where councils have given the go-ahead for further extraction of brick clay and limestone, including...

Widespread building using fresh materials comes despite repeated promises by Coalition ministers that they would safeguard our dwindling reserves of building materials.


H/t Alan at HPC.

3 comments:

Bayard said...

Yeah, but they only want to build on the land because it's the Green Belt. You can pretty well guarantee that the developers will turn into the most rabid type of NIMBY once they have their planning permission (or at least until they have sold all the plots, then they will be trying to build next door).

Mark Wadsworth said...

B: "You can pretty well guarantee that the developers will turn into the most rabid type of NIMBY once they have their planning permission (or at least until they have sold all the plots, then they will be trying to build next door)."

You get rabid NIMBYism in towns as well.

The Stigler said...

If the FBRI homies spent even a second thinking about their situation, they'd realise how impossible it is. They've paid a premium to live in their ersatz rural idyll, but it's also how a load of other people would like to live - in Windsor rather than Slough, in York rather than Leeds, in a village around Oxford rather than say, Botley.

And they keep talking about brownfield sites, but there just ain't many left that can be easily developed on, or someone would have done it.